Relationships and Tango

Relationships and Tango

Relationships and TangoThe other day, I was having a conversation with my friend Kelly, and he quoted Carlos Eduardo Gavito, a tango dancer, when he said: “Any man who dances and doesn’t look at the woman as a queen, will never be a king. It’s all about respect for the woman. The woman needs to trust the one she’s dancing with. She needs to be able to trust in the embrace and trust in where she’s being led”. I think it’s a great quote, and it’s not speaking about tango only, but about life (and relationships) in general.

From that same interview, I extracted this quote:
“It’s not something that is all about one person, there are not “bosses” or “leaders”. It’s really about freedom. (…) Many people, no just me, but many people believe the most beautiful thing you can do in tango is in the embrace. Many people have picked up on this in various lessons and schools. No, no, this is something in each of us. It’s something that exists in each one of us. It’s the warmth. When you’re taking another person, ‘I’m protected’ ‘I’m not alone.’ That’s tango. It’s the passion.”. Again: Is that tango what he’s describing, or is it something else?

Sir, can you help me?

Sir, can you help me?

Sir, can you help me?Maybe when Phil Collins sang “Another Day for You and Me in Paradise”, he had just taken a walk down the Paris Gare de Lyon. Paris is a city of contrasts, and thinking about it takes my mind back to the Hunchback of Notre dame. Even back then, Paris was filled with people who really did not have a place to call home, who were at the same time surrounded by all the creature comforts and glamor that Paris offers those who have money. The Hunchback, simply because he was different, was cast out, treated like a demon and the only person who could take him in was a man of God. He lived a haunted life, hidden from the world, molested each time he stepped out. Thank God for Happily Ever After endings. Today, that story’s ending would probably have been very different.